These relative new-comers to the National Park / Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty world have a charm all of their own…

Mud or the retention of water!

If you thought that Pendle Hill was somewhat ‘peaty’ and that Grit Fell was shall we say ‘textured’ then you are in for a real treat when you go a-walking on the slopes of the hills of the West Pennine Moors. At their best these hills can be bleak and desolate and a little exposed, this they have in common with hills slighty further north in the Forest of Bowland. Having tackled Winter Hill only recently and still being able to remember the state of my feet after tramping around Holcombe Hill and Darwen Hill I can say with conviction they’re marshy!

The West Pennine Moors are roughly 90 square miles in extent and a great deal of this is moorland and reservoir scenery, they stretch from west Blackburn to Bolton and from Chorley to Bury, a compact area relatively speaking but on one of great beauty and diversity. The villages contained within the boundary tend to share a similar picturesque quality, stone cottages and historic public houses turning into more of a norm than an exception!

For more information regarding the West Pennine Moors visit the following web site: http://www.westpenninemoors.com/

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